Nytt

En ny middelklasse i Kina føler usikkerhet for fremtiden, spesielt barna. I titusener drar de til høytutviklede land på jakt etter en bedre fremtid, og større personlig frihet.

Dette er achievers, folk som kan, men som er usikre på fremtiden, de ønsker en fot i et annet land.

 

“People who are middle class in China don’t feel secure for their future and especially for their children’s future,” said Cao Cong, an associate professor at the University of Nottingham who has studied Chinese migration. “They don’t think the political situation is stable.”

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Few emigrants from China cite politics, but it underlies many of their concerns. They talk about a development-at-all-costs strategy that has ruined the environment, as well as a deteriorating social and moral fabric that makes China feel like a chillier place than when they were growing up. Over all, there is a sense that despite all the gains in recent decades, China’s political and social trajectory is still highly uncertain.

Kina taper ungdommen

Dette er mennesker Kina ikke har råd til å tape. For hver som greier seg vil flere forsøke å søke lykken utenlands. Kina har investert i deres utdannelse, nå er det andre som høster gevinsten. Hjerneflukten er et dårlig tegn for Kina.

Like hundreds of thousands of Chinese who leave each year, she was driven by an overriding sense that she could do better outside China. Despite China’s tremendous economic successes in recent years, she was lured by Australia’s healthier environment, robust social services and the freedom to start a family in a country that guarantees religious freedoms.

At 30, Chen Kuo had what many Chinese dream of: her own apartment and a well-paying job at a multinational corporation. But in mid-October, Ms. Chen boarded a midnight flight for Australia to begin a new life with no sure prospects.

Like hundreds of thousands of Chinese who leave each year, she was driven by an overriding sense that she could do better outside China. Despite China’s tremendous economic successes in recent years, she was lured by Australia’s healthier environment, robust social services and the freedom to start a family in a country that guarantees religious freedoms.

“It’s very stressful in China — sometimes I was working 128 hours a week for my auditing company,” Ms. Chen said in her Beijing apartment a few hours before leaving. “And it will be easier raising my children as Christians abroad. It is more free in Australia.”

Kristen – toleranse

Vi har hørt at mange kinesere omvender seg til kristendommen. Noen snakker i ramme alvor om at Kina vil bli kristent. Nå er det altså kristne som søker utenlands for å kunne gi barna en friere kristen oppdragelse. Nok et dårlig tegn.

Det er ikke mange år siden vi hørte om at kinesiske studenter i USA reiste hjem for å bidra til å bygge landet. Trenden har snudd. Nå søker de individuell lykke.

 

Individual countries report the trend continuing. In 2011, the United States received 87,000 permanent residents from China, up from 70,000 the year before. Chinese immigrants are driving real estate booms in places as varied as Midtown Manhattan, where some enterprising agents are learning Mandarin, to the Mediterranean island of Cyprus, which offers a route to a European Union passport.

Kinesere har vært vant til å tenke diaspora. Enten det er i Malaysia, Indonesia eller USA. Dagens flukt bygger på samme mønster: man vil ha flere ben å stå på. En suksessfull sønn i utlandet kan en dag være redningen.

Zhang Ling, the owner of a restaurant in the coastal city of Wenzhou, is one such worrier. His extended family of farmers and tradesmen pooled its money to send his son to high school in Vancouver, Canada. The family hopes he will get into a Canadian university and one day gain permanent residency, perhaps allowing them all to move overseas. “It’s like a chair with different legs,” Mr. Zhang said. “We want one leg in Canada just in case a leg breaks here.”

Dette er kinesisk prudence. Kinesiske myndigheter har sluppet løs grådigheten. Nå sies det samme som i Russland: man må være korrupt for å overleve. Rettighetene til eiere respekteres ikke. Da mister Kina de som skulle gjøre landet sivilisert og demokratisk.

 

Wang Ruijin, a secretary at a Beijing media company, said she and her husband were pushing their 23-year-old daughter to apply for graduate school in New Zealand, hoping she can stay and open the door for the family. They do not think she will get a scholarship, Ms. Wang said, so the family is borrowing money as a kind of long-term investment.

“We don’t feel that China is suitable for people like us,” Ms. Wang said. “To get ahead here you have to be corrupt or have connections; we prefer a stable life.”

Folk stemmer med føttene

Kina har et program for å lokke studenter i utlandet hjem. De får jobber og fordeler. Men etter fem år er det slutt. Da opplever de samme problemer som alle andre.

 

Perhaps signaling that the government is concerned, the topic has been extensively debated in the official media. Fang Zhulan, a professor at Renmin University in Beijing, wrote in the semiofficial magazine People’s Forum that many people were “voting with their feet,” calling the exodus “a negative comment by entrepreneurs upon the protection and realization of their rights in the current system.”

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“Returnees can see that they will become ordinary Chinese after five years and be in the same bad situation as their colleagues” already in China, he said. “That means that few are attracted to stay for the long run.”

 

Transparens og åpenhet er hva Kina mangler, og den lukkede utvelgelsen av nye ledere forteller de «nye» kineserne at landet ikke har beveget seg stort det siste tiåret.

 

“I’m excited to be here but I’m puzzled about the development path,” said Bruce Peng, who earned a master’s degree last year at Harvard and now runs a consulting company, Ivy Magna, in Beijing. Mr. Peng is staying in China for now, but he says many of his 100 clients have a foreign passport or would like one. Most own or manage small- and medium-size businesses, which have been squeezed by the policies favoring state enterprises.

“Sometimes your own property and company situation can be very complicated,” Mr. Peng said. “Some people might want to live in a more transparent and democratic society.”

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/01/world/asia/wary-of-future-many-professionals-leave-china.html?pagewanted=2&ref=global-home&_r=0