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Nicola Sarkozy sier Frankrike må tillate positiv diskriminering, hvis de unge i forstedene skal ha noen mulighet. Hans uttalelse er stikk i strid med hva president Jacques Chirac sa for bare to dager siden.

Sarkozy får så dårlig presse at han fortjener å bli sitert på andre ting enn lov og orden. Meningsmålinger viser at det er ham franskmenn flest stoler på.

Interior Minister and presidential hopeful Nicolas Sarkozy stepped up calls on Wednesday for France to introduce measures to help minorities find jobs, directly challenging President Jacques Chirac.
Boosted by an opinion poll showing strong voter support for his tough response to France’s worst civil unrest in almost 40 years, Sarkozy fanned controversy over how to bring disaffected youths into 2_kommentarstream French society.
Violence continued for the 20th successive night, but police said the number of vehicles set on fire fell to a low of 163. A law extending anti-riot powers for three months was passed in parliament.
Sarkozy has called before for «affirmative action» to tackle higher than average unemployment among minorities — one of the problems angering rioting youngsters in run-down suburbs. Many of them are of African and Arab origin.
The timing of his appeal, two days after Chirac ruled out such steps in a televised address, underlined their differences.
«I challenge the idea that we all start at the same starting line in life,» Sarkozy told L’Express magazine in an interview.
«Some people start further back because they have a handicap — colour, culture or the district they come from. So we have to help them,» he said.
Without referring directly to positive discrimination, Sarkozy also touched on the issue in parliament. «There are young people in France who have less than others and who need more help than others,» he said during government question time.
Chirac said on Monday he wanted to tackle the «poison» of discrimination but rejected moves such as setting quotas for minorities at the workplace.
Sarkozy’s remarks not only set him apart from Chirac but also from Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin, his 2_kommentar challenger to lead the centre-right into the 2007 presidential election. Villepin has also rejected positive discrimination.(reuters)