Gjesteskribent

Ekstremvolden i Irak har fått ungdommen til å vende seg bort fra fanatisk religion. Da de fikk kjenne den på kroppen, fikk de et annet syn. Mange irakerne deler denne oppfatningen: da samfunnet var på vei ned i avgrunnen besinnet de seg. Det, vel så mye som the Surge, er grunn til at situasjonen er roligere.

Sabrina Tavernise som i en avskjedsartikkel som korrespondent beskrev landet som et tog som kolliderer i slow motion, har snakket med et 40-tall ungdommer over hele landet, og de sier det samme: de er fed up med religion.

After almost five years of war, many young people in Iraq, exhausted by constant firsthand exposure to the violence of religious extremism, say they have grown disillusioned with religious leaders and skeptical of the faith that they preach.

In two months of interviews with 40 young people in five Iraqi cities, a pattern of disenchantment emerged, in which young Iraqis, both poor and middle class, blamed clerics for the violence and the restrictions that have narrowed their lives.

«I hate Islam and all the clerics because they limit our freedom every day and their instruction became heavy over us,» said Sara, a high school student in Basra. «Most of the girls in my high school hate that Islamic people control the authority because they don’t deserve to be rulers.»

Atheer, a 19-year-old from a poor, heavily Shiite neighborhood in southern Baghdad, said: «The religion men are liars. Young people don’t believe them. Guys my age are not interested in religion anymore.»

The shift in Iraq runs counter to trends of rising religious practice among young people across much of the Middle East, where religion has replaced nationalism as a unifying ideology.

While religious extremists are admired by a number of young people in other parts of the Arab world, Iraq offers a test case of what could happen when extremist theories are applied. Fingers caught in the act of smoking were broken. Long hair was cut and force-fed to its wearer. In that laboratory, disillusionment with Islamic leaders took hold.

It is far from clear whether the shift means a wholesale turn away from religion. A tremendous piety still predominates in the private lives of young Iraqis, and religious leaders, despite the increased skepticism, still wield tremendous power. Measuring religious adherence, furthermore, is a tricky business in Iraq, where access to cities and towns far from Baghdad is limited.

But a shift seems to be registering, at least anecdotally, in the choices some young Iraqis are making.

Professors reported difficulty in recruiting graduate students for religion classes. Attendance at weekly prayers appears to be down, even in areas where the violence has largely subsided, according to worshipers and imams in Baghdad and Falluja. In two visits to the weekly prayer session in Baghdad of the followers of the militant Shiite cleric Moktada al-Sadr this fall, vastly smaller crowds attended than had in 2004 or 2005.

Such patterns, if lasting, could lead to a weakening of the political power of religious leaders in Iraq. In a nod to those changing tastes, political parties are dropping overt references to religion.

‘You Cost Us This’

«In the beginning, they gave their eyes and minds to the clerics; they trusted them,» said Abu Mahmoud, a moderate Sunni cleric in Baghdad, who now works deprogramming religious extremists in American detention. «It’s painful to admit, but it’s changed. People have lost too much. They say to the clerics and the parties: You cost us this.»

«When they behead someone, they say ‘Allahu akbar,’ they read Koranic verse,» said a moderate Shiite sheik from Baghdad, using the phrase for «God is great.»

«The young people, they think that is Islam,» he said. «So Islam is a failure, not only in the students’ minds, but also in the community.»

A professor at Baghdad University’s School of Law, who identified herself only as Bushra, said of her students: «They have changed their views about religion. They started to hate religious men. They make jokes about them because they feel disgusted by them.»

Shia-nasjonalisme

For shiaene var det å kunne gi åpent uttrykk for deres religiøsitet en personlig og kollektiv frigjøring. De var blitt nådeløst undertrykket av Saddam. Men mange voldsmenn og «upstarts» red på bølgen.

Religion had moved abruptly into the Shiite public space, but often in ways that made educated, religious Iraqis uncomfortable. Militias were offering Koran courses. Titles came cheaply. In Mr. Mahmoud’s neighborhood, a butcher with no knowledge of Islam became the leader of a mosque.

A moderate Shiite cleric, Sheik Qasim, recalled watching in amazement as a former student, who never earned more than mediocre marks, whizzed by stalled traffic in a long convoy of sport utility vehicles in central Baghdad. He had become a religious leader.

«I thought I would get out of the car, grab him and slap him!» said the sheik. «These people don’t deserve their positions.»

An official for the Ministry of Education in Baghdad, a secular Shiite, described the newfound faith like this: «It was like they wanted to put on a new, stylish outfit.»

Sunni-ekstremisme

Religious Sunnis, for their part, also experienced a heady swell in mosque attendance, but soon became the hosts for groups of religious extremists, foreign and Iraqi, who were preparing to fight the United States.

Zane Mohammed, a gangly 19-year-old with an earnest face, watched with curiosity as the first Islamists in his Baghdad neighborhood came to barbershops, tea parlors and carpentry stores before taking over the mosques. They were neither uneducated nor poor, he said, though they focused on those who were.

Then, one morning while waiting for a bus to school, he watched a man walk up to a neighbor, a college professor whose sect Mr. Mohammed did not know, shoot the neighbor at point blank range three times, and walk back to his car as calmly «as if he was leaving a grocery store.»

«Nobody is thinking,» Mr. Mohammed said in an interview in October. «We use our minds just to know what to eat. This is something I am very sad about. We hear things and just believe them.»

Voldens dynamikk

Weary of Bloodshed

By 2006, even those who had initially taken part in the violence were growing weary. Haidar, a grade-school dropout, was proud to tell his family he was following a Shiite cleric in a fight against American soldiers in the summer of 2004. Two years later, however, he found himself in the company of gangsters.

Young militia members were abusing drugs. Gift mopeds had become gift guns. In three years, Haidar saw five killings, mostly of Sunnis, including that of a Sunni cab driver shot for his car.

It was just as bad, if not worse, for young Sunnis. Rubbed raw by Al Qaeda in Mesopotamia, a homegrown Sunni insurgent group that American intelligence says is led by foreigners, they found themselves stranded in neighborhoods that were governed by seventh-century rules. During an interview with a dozen Sunni teenage boys in a Baghdad detention facility on several sticky days in September, several of them expressed relief at being in jail, so they could wear shorts, a form of dress they would have been punished for in their neighborhoods.

Penger og tilhørighet

But while younger people were taking a more active role in the violence, their motivation was less likely than that of the adults to be religion-driven. Of the 900 juvenile detainees in American custody in November, fewer than 10 percent claimed to be fighting a holy war, according to the American military. About one-third of adults said they were.

A worker in the American detention system said that by her estimate, only about a third of the adult detainee population, which is overwhelmingly Sunni, prayed.

«As a group, they are not religious,» said Maj. Gen. Douglas Stone, the head of detainee operations for the American military. «When we ask if they are doing it for jihad, the answer is no.»

Muath, a slender, 19-year-old Sunni with distant eyes and hollow cheeks, is typical. He was selling cellphone credits and plastic flowers, struggling to keep his mother and five young siblings afloat, when an insurgent recruiter in western Baghdad, a man in his 30s who is a regular customer, offered him cash last spring to be part of an insurgent group whose motivations were a mix of money and sect.

Ren grådighet

Indeed, at least part of the religious violence in Baghdad had money at its heart. An officer at the Kadhimiya detention center, where Muath was being held last fall, said recordings of beheadings fetched much higher prices than those of shooting executions in the CD markets, which explains why even nonreligious kidnappers will behead hostages.

«The terrorist loves the money,» said Capt. Omar, a prison worker who did not want to be identified by his full name. «The money has big magic. I give him $10,000 to do small thing. You think he refuse?»

Virkelig vold og romantisert vold

«I used to love Osama bin Laden,» proclaimed a 24-year-old Iraqi college student. She was referring to how she felt before the war took hold in her native Baghdad. The Sept. 11, 2001, strike at American supremacy was satisfying, and the deaths abstract.

Now, the student recites the familiar complaints: Her college has segregated the security checks; guards told her to stop wearing a revealing skirt; she covers her head for safety.

«Now I hate Islam,» she said, sitting in her family’s unadorned living room in central Baghdad. «Al Qaeda and the Mahdi Army are spreading hatred. People are being killed for nothing.»

Smarte

Recruiters are relentless, and, as it turns out, clever, peddling things their young targets need. General Stone compares it to as a sales pitch a pimp gives to a prospective prostitute. American military officers at the American detention center said it was the Qaeda detainees who were best prepared for group sessions and asked the most questions.

A Qaeda recruiter approached Mr. Mohammed, the 19-year-old, on a college campus with the offer of English lessons. Though lessons had been a personal ambition of Mr. Mohammed’s for months, once he knew what the man was after, he politely avoided him.

«When you talk with them, you find them very modern, very smart,» said Mr. Mohammed, a non-religious Shiite, who recalled feigning disdain for his own sect to avoid suspicion.

The population they focused on, however, was poor and uneducated. About 60 percent of the American adult detainee population is illiterate, and is unable to even read the Koran that religious recruiters are preaching.

That leads to strange twists. One young detainee, a client of Abu Mahmoud, the moderate Sunni cleric, was convinced that he had to kill his parents when he was released, because they were married in an insufficiently Islamic way. General Stone is trying to rectify the problem by offering religion classes taught by moderates.

Violence Leaves Young Iraqis Doubting Clerics