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Det eksploderte bomber både i den sveitsiske og russiske ambassaden i Athen tirsdag. På bakgrunn av flyfraktbombene i Dubai og Midlands, vekker brevbombene ekstra engstelse.

Letter bombs exploded at the Swiss and Russian embassies in Athens on Tuesday and three more devices were found by police at prominent buildings in the capital as counter-terrorism officers questioned two suspects in connection with a series of attacks that began on Monday. No injuries were reported in the explosions on Tuesday.

There was no claim of responsibility for the string of attacks but a police spokesman quoted by Reuters said that they appeared to be the work of Greek leftists.

According to Greek media reports, the bomb sent to the Swiss Embassy went off at about noon when it was thrown into the front yard by embassy personnel who regarded it as suspicious following thwarted bomb attacks against other diplomatic missions the day before. There were no immediate details about the blast at the Russian Embassy.

A device sent to the Bulgarian Embassy was destroyed by police bomb disposal experts shortly afterward. Another letter bomb, addressed to the Chilean Embassy, was destroyed by police outside Parliament. A fourth package, addressed to the German Embassy, was returned to the courier firm which had delivered it and destroyed.

The Greek police went on alert on Monday after a package addressed to the Mexican Embassy exploded in the hands of a courier firm worker, causing minor injuries. Police detained two suspects and destroyed three more letter bombs. One addressed was to French President Nicolas Sarkozy and the others to the Belgian and Dutch embassies. Police did not suggest a possible motive for the selected targets.

A spokesman for the Greek police, who was not authorized to speak publicly, would not comment on the ongoing investigation but said ballistics tests showed that two nine-millimeter Glock pistols confiscated from the suspects had not been used in previous terrorist attacks.

Letter Bombs Explode at Embassies in Athens