Sakset/Fra hofta

Thomas L. Friedman har vært på Grønland og sett isen smelte. Det gjør inntrykk. Han lærte et nytt uttrykk av grønlenderne og oversetter det til Climate speak. Været er rettesnor. Det heter ikke lenger: slik var det før. Nå heter det: det har aldri skjedd før. Ingenting stemmer lenger.

Dette språket vil også våre unger måtte lære seg og de vil bruke sitt voksne liv på å bekjempe det vi har skapt, sier Friedman.

my trip with Denmark’s minister of climate and energy, Connie Hedegaard, to see the effects of climate change on Greenland’s ice sheet leaves me with a very strong opinion: Our kids are going to be so angry with us one day.

We’ve charged their future on our Visa cards. We’ve added so many greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, for our generation’s growth, that our kids are likely going to spend a good part of their adulthood, maybe all of it, just dealing with the climate implications of our profligacy. And now our leaders are telling them the way out is «offshore drilling» for more climate-changing fossil fuels.

Madness. Sheer madness.
..
Just a few years ago you could dogsled in winter from Greenland, across a 40-mile ice bank, to Disko Island. But for the past few years, the rising winter temperatures in Greenland have melted that link. Now Disko is cut off. Put away the dogsled.

There has been a 30 percent increase in the melting of the Greenland ice sheet between 1979 and 2007, and in 2007, the melt was 10 percent bigger than in any previous year, said Konrad Steffen, director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, which monitors the ice. Greenland is now losing 200 cubic kilometers of ice per year — from melt and ice sliding into the ocean from outlet glaciers along its edges — which far exceeds the volume of all the ice in the European Alps, he added. «Everything is happening faster than anticipated.»


Learning to Speak Climate

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