Alle medier som forsøker å fremstille Brorskapet i Egypt som offer bør tenke over hvordan de behandler andre, som landets kristne. Over hele Egypt meldes det om kristne som blir angrepet. Islamister har utpekt dem som ansvarlige for at Mohamed Morsi ble styrtet, og som «frekke» som våget å slutte seg til opposisjonen.

Dette er trekk ved islamismens natur: man bruker sin rolle som offer aggresivt, og sanker støtte, men har ingen skrupler med å gå løs på andre og svakere. Det syns ikke å vekke moralske kvaler.

Spørsmålet støttespillerne bør stille seg er: hvordan vil Brorskapet og tilhengerne oppføre seg hvis de igjen skulle komme til makten?

While tensions between the Christian minority and extremist elements in the Muslim majority are not new, attacks have been reported across the country — in the northern Sinai Peninsula, in a resort town on the Mediterranean Coast, in Port Said along the Suez Canal and in isolated villages in upper Egypt.

A priest has been shot dead in the street, Islamists have painted black X’s on Christian shops to mark them for arson and mobs have attacked churches and besieged Christians in their homes. Four Christians were reported killed with knives and machetes in one village last week.

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“They thought Christians played a big role in the protests and in the army’s intervention to topple Morsi, so this is revenge for that,” said Ishaq Ibrahim, who has documented the violence for the Cairo-based Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights.

In some places, Christians were warned not to participate in the anti-Morsi protests.

Fliers distributed in the upper Egypt province of Minya, documented by the rights group, said that “one liter of gas can light up your gold, wood, plumbing, tractor and carpentry shops, buses, cars, gardens and maybe houses, churches, schools, agricultural fields and workshops.”

They were signed “people who care for the country.”

After Mr. Morsi’s ouster, Islamist mobs in the village of Dagala looted one church, burned a building belonging to another and surrounded Christian homes, shattering their windows with rocks and clubs, the group said.

After one Christian man shot at the attackers from his roof, they dragged his wife from the house and shot her. She is in a hospital.

“The police came the day after the events, and they didn’t do anything,” Mr. Ibrahim said. “People prevented the fire engines from coming in so they couldn’t do anything.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/12/world/middleeast/egypt-christians.html?pagewanted=1&ref=world