Kommentar

Kongressvalget i USA ser ut til å bli et stort politisk skifte. President Barack Obama vil bli alvorlig svekket og må skrinlegge prosjekter, og søke kompromisser. Kanskje må han ofre helsereformen.

I norske medier kommer ikke motstanden mot helsereformen frem. De siste målingene viser at 47 prosent er mot, og bare noen og tyve prosent for.

Republikanerne ser ut til å gjøre det godt i distrikter som stemte for Hillary Clinton under primærvalgene i 2008.

Et annet viktig spørsmål er hvor mange republikanerne som er Tea Party-affillierte. Foreløpig ser det ut til at Tea Party-kandidater gjør det meget godt.

The surveys, by Edison Research, an independent group that conducts the polling for the news media, found more than 8 in 10 voters worried about the direction of the economy over the next year and more than 4 in 10 saying their own family’s financial situation had worsened in the last two years.

The results confirmed the grim outlook about the current state of the country that has had Democrats bracing for steep losses and Republicans optimistic about making strong midterm gains in both the House and Senate.

The surveys found voters even more unhappy with Congress now than they were in 2006, when Democrats reclaimed control from the Republicans, and even more likely this year than at that point to say the country was moving in the wrong direction. The initial results also indicated an electorate far more conservative than in 2006, a sign of stronger turnout by people leaning toward the Republicans.

Most voters said they believed Mr. Obama’s policies would hurt the country in the long run, rather than help it and about

4 in 10 voters said that they supported the Tea Party movement, which has backed insurgent candidates all across the country.

Given the bleak voter sentiment, Republicans seemed well within reach of capturing the 39 seats that they need to win a majority in the House, which Democrats now hold by a margin of 255 to 178, with two vacancies.

If they succeed, the Republicans would break the one-party lock that Democrats have held on Washington since Mr. Obama’s victory in 2008. They would also set new parameters for the remainder of the president’s term, potentially slamming the brakes on what has been, by any historical standard, a remarkably ambitious agenda, and forcing the administration to rethink many of its policies, especially on the economy.

Surveys Show Voter Unease With Obama and Congress