Guardian/Observers Luke Harding har besøkt Ansar al-Islams område i Nord-Irak. Han ble invitert av gruppen sammen med andre journalister, så det finnes reportasjer av dette slaget flere steder. Harding skriver at det ikke fantes tegn til kjemiske våpen eller produksjon:

«Behind the barbed wire, and a courtyard strewn with broken rocket parts, are a few empty concrete houses. There is a bakery. There is no sign of chemical weapons anywhere – only the smell of paraffin and vegetable ghee used for cooking. In the kitchen, I discovered some chopped up tomatoes but not much else. The cook had left his Kalashnikov propped neatly against the wall.»

PUK sier noe annet:

«Senior officials from the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan – the party with which Ansar is at war – insist that the Islamic guerrillas based in the village have been experimenting with poisons. They have smeared a crude form of cyanide on door handles. They had even tried it out on several farm animals, including sheep and donkeys, they claim. The guerrillas have also managed to construct a 1.5kg ‘chemical’ bomb designed to explode and kill anyone within a 50-metre radius, Kurdish intelligence sources say.»

Hvem finansierer Ansar? Ressurser mangler ikke:

«….despite the fact there appeared to be no evidence of chemical experimentation, Ansar’s complex was lavish for an organisation that purports to be made up merely of simple Muslims. Concealed in a concrete bunker, we discovered a sophisticated television studio, complete with cameras, editing equipment and a scanner. In a neighbouring room were several computers, beneath shelves full of videotapes. A banner written in Arabic proclaims: ‘Those who believe in Islam will be rewarded.’
Until recently Ansar had its own website where the faithful could log on to footage of Ansar guerrillas in battle. In small concrete bunkers the fighters operated their own radio station, Radio Jihad. The announcer had clearly been sitting on an empty box of explosives. Hassan denied yesterday that his revolutionary group received any funding from Baghdad or from Iran, a short hike away over the mountains. ‘If Colin Powell were to come here he would see that we have nothing to hide,’ he said. But Ansar’s sources of funding re2_kommentar mysterious – and their real purpose tantalisingly unclear. ‘All Ansar fighters are from Iraq,’ Hassan said. ‘Iraq is one of the richest countries in the world. Our fighters have brought their own things with them.’ «